Family Research – English, Scottish and Irish Genealogy

Archive for May, 2012

Commissary court records

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

The National Archives of Scotland (NAS) holds the records of the commissary courts. At the Reformation of 1560, the system of consistorial courts where the bishops exercised their civil jurisdiction over executry and matrimonial cases, broke down. This led to such confusion that the commissary courts were re-established between 1564 and 1566. The new system of commissary courts lasted until 1823.

The principal commissary court at Edinburgh had general jurisdiction over the whole of Scotland and local jurisdiction over the Lothians, Peebles and part of Stirlingshire, the two latter areas being later removed. for more click here

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Adoption records

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Adoptions before 1930
Before 1930 adoptions were arranged on a private basis, either by individuals or by one of a number of charitable adoption agencies. NAS currently holds no records for adoptions before 1930.

Adoptions after 1930
The Adoption of Children (Scotland) Act, 1930 introduced legal adoption into Scotland from that year. Adoptions since then have normally been arranged by charitable bodies or by local authority social work departments and then ratified by the civil courts. The majority of adoptions are ratified through the local sheriff courts, although a tiny number (perhaps two or three each year) are settled through the Court of Session in Edinburgh.

Advice and counselling
Often adopted people can find the whole business of tracking down their birth parents very distressing. Similarly, the adoption papers themselves can sometimes contain upsetting revelations. Because of this it is best to seek advice and counselling before beginning such a search. If you are starting from scratch, the best first step is to identify the agency that arranged the adoption. The following services both offer counselling and advice: for more click here

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Burgh records

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Introduction
The National Archives of Scotland (NAS) holds a variety of records relating to burghs. The earliest burghs date from the reign of David I (1124-53). He introduced feudal tenure into Scotland and encouraged the growth of towns as a means of fostering trade and increasing crown revenues. The burgh’s privileges and obligations, including trading privileges and the right to hold markets, were enshrined in a charter granted by the king or other feudal superior. In return for their privileges, royal burghs made annual payments to the crown of the rents of burgh properties and the customs of trade. Later this became a fixed annual sum. Any surplus money was paid into the ‘common good fund’ for the benefit of the burgh. for more click here

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From steel beams to American icon: Golden Gate Bridge celebrates 75 years as an engineering masterpiece

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

It was built as the country was emerging from the Great Depression, and grew into an icon of America.

It was also heralded as an engineering marvel when it opened in 1937. It was the world’s longest suspension span and had been built across a strait that critics said was too treacherous to be bridged. for more click here

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The lost Valleys: Unique photographs of life in mid-19th century Wales reveal a vanished world

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Fascinating snapshot images from 1860s form part of rare photo album which could fetch up to £500 at auction. for more click here

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Scotland

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

Welcome to our Scotland family history research page. Here you’ll find record collections, history, and genealogy resources to help you trace your Scotland ancestors. for more click here

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Catalogues and indexes

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

Each collection of records held by the National Archives of Scotland (NAS) has a catalogue or index to help you find the right material whether it’s a file or a single document.

Catalogues are lists of archives according to where they came from and when they were created (their provenance). The catalogues have an alpha-numeric reference system, for example HD4/5.
Indexes by surname, placename or topic are sometimes made of certain types of record to allow you to find individual documents easily.

for more click here

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Publications

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

The National Archives of Scotland (NAS) has been making the archives of Scotland available through its publications since the early 19th century. So whether you are studying history or reading it purely for your own pleasure, our range of publications can help bring the past alive. for more click here

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The Scottish Records Association

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

The Scottish Records Association was founded in 1977 and is concerned with the preservation and use of historical records in Scotland. It provides a forum where users, owners and custodians of records can discuss matters relating to their custody, conservation and accessibility. for more click here

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Frank loves Helen: 65 years on, WWII soldier’s love note on a tree is revealed to wife he carved it for

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

They married in secret a few days before he went to war.

Frank Fearing had no idea if he would ever see young Helen again, but he made her a solemn promise. Everywhere the American GI went with his unit, he would carve their names into a tree.

The first was on Salisbury Plain, where he was stationed before joining the push towards Berlin in the wake of the D-Day invasion. The rest were spread across France and Germany, carved whenever time allowed. for more click here

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